10步创建成功的Web2.0公司

10 Steps to a Hugely Successful Web 2.0 Company
Do you want to make money in your own home?

Forget real estate scams, tupperware, or becoming a spammer.

Create your own Web 2.0 company NOW!!

Its easy. Just follow these 10 simple steps and you, too, can be seen in fine dining establishments like Jamba Juice and speaking on panels for conferences like Distribucate 2.0, Fred, Bloggerstock and Elfdex.

1. Solve the smallest possible problem (that is still big enough to matter) for the user and know exactly what problem you're trying to solve. Google's first and primary job was very simple: Help people find stuff. They didn't start layering on everything else until much later. Brad calls this the “narrow point of the wedge.” Its the easiest, simplest version of what you're trying to do… the smallest bite your users will ever have to chew–small enough to get hooked on very easily.

2. Get a responsive and chatty audience using the product. The del.icio.us community eats new features like piranhas. They pour over the service, discuss it, promote it, and complain when they don't like stuff. You couldn't have hired a better, more thorough, or more passionate group of alpha testers. Don't rush to get the service so easy that my dad can use it, because he's not going to really be helpful to you in the early days when you need really hardcore Beta testing.

3. Launch. Now. Tomorrow. Every day. Don't wait until its perfect to put it out in the open. No more closed invite-only betas. Your idea of perfect may not jive with your users' ideas of perfect. Put whatever you can out there and get people using it as soon as possible. Feed them daily with new features to keep them interested and coming back. No one likes waiting six years for new releases.

4. Distribute. Distribute. Distribute. Don't force your users to play on your site in a walled garden. Let them take the service and use it wherever they want. (See Flickr badges, Google Ads, Amazon affiliates, Indeed jobrolls, del.icio.us linkrolls, moblogging, RSS, e-mail alerts, etc., etc….) Instead of building it so they will come, go out and get them by placing little bits of your service everywhere on the web. Be where they are.

5. Don't hold users against their will. If they want to leave, let them pick up with all of the content they created while they were on your site and leave… for free. Charging $0.29 to get back each of the hi rez photos you uploaded to the site (See my upcoming Snapfish post) is thievery. You have to let the barn door open and focus on keeping your customers fed, so they want to come back, instead of coming back because they're stuck.

6. Be mindnumbingly simple. Extra clicks are deadly. People just won't do it. Indeed: One search, all jobs. Two boxes: What job and where. You can't get any easier than that and all it takes is for someone to put one search in for people to go, “Wait…what's this… links to Monster AND Careerbuilder??”

7. Get people hooked on free. Craigslist wouldn't have become Craigslist if it wasn't free for so much for so long. Even now, they're very profitable and they're only charging for just a few small pieces of their service in just a handful of their 120 markets. The world is changing. Service is cheaper to provide now than ever and users are expecting to get more for free than ever before. Its hard for a lot of big companies to accept that. I just had lunch recently with a couple of friends from a music publisher. They were signing some bands to “incubator” deals for just a couple of songs to test the market with them. I said, “And you're giving those songs away for free, right?” They nearly choked on their food. 🙂 Well, why the heck wouldn't they? Give a few songs away for free, generate buzz, get lots more people to buy future albums. Seth Godin did that with his books, releasing e-books that generated buzz around hardcover sales. Free sells. Do you think the Facebook would be the Facebook if you had to pay for your smooches like you do on Match?

8. Don't waste any money on marketing. Word of mouth has never ever been easier or less expensive in the history of human communication. Things go viral in a hurry… when they're good. Ever see a Skype superbowl commercial? No, but they've had 146 million people download it. If you don't have the service and the quality to back it up, no amount of fancy marketing is going to help… and people are so quick to share cool stuff, because they want to be the person “in the know”. When they're satisfied, they'll blog about it and e-mail everyone they know. And they'll tag it furiously on del.icio.us, too.

9. Don't overfund. Do you know how many times a day I see companies get funded on Private Equity Week and I'm like, “What the heck are they going to do with all that money??” Underfunding a company can be a problem, too, but thinking that more money makes you better is a fallacy. It probably makes you a bit sloppy and fuzzies your focus. When you raise $2 million, you're much more likely to have a clear sense of exactly where that money is going to go than if you raised $20 million.

10. No one sucks. I hate it when someone says that a whole service sucks. Now, I say it myself, I'll admit, but what that does is it teaches you to discount and generalize, and probably miss a lot of small opportunities that add up. Now, I think Ofoto sucks versus Flickr, but people still use it. Why? There's got to be something there. AOL sucks… or does it? They still have 20 million users, so it can't entirely suck. You should look at every competitor and take the best of what they do right and do it yourself, even if that's only one thing and the rest of their service sucks.

2005/08/26 Friday, 20:08
Filed under: From Model to IPO
Tags: Web2.0
Web2.0无论在国内外的IT界都是热门话题,我都没想到前几天的那篇“谁是中国未来十年的Web2.0英雄”会是那么hot的一篇文章,估计我今天这个惹眼的blog标题也会让这篇blog很火热:)。国内很多对Web2.0的讨论都是在理论层面上的,而今天看到的这篇blog则是从操作层面上阐述如何创建一个成功的Web2.0网站,其中谈论的一些手法值得国内的Web2.0公司去借鉴。

1、为用户解决一个“小”问题,并清楚地知道你要解决的是什么问题。我的理解就是从一个小处着眼,而这个小处恰恰是用户需求没有得到满足的地方。比如文章中举的Google的例子,Google开始只是为解决大家资料搜索的困难(不过Google算Web2.0网站吗?呵呵),比如Flickr就是为了解决大家图片的存储与共享的困难,从这样针对性的“小处”开始,能够一针见血地吸引到用户来使用你的服务。

2、找到负责任而且积极参与讨论的用户。拥有这些投入的用户是你最大的财富,他们会不停地提出各种改进建议,让你的服务变得更加完美。

3、尽早推出。不要等到服务“完美”了之后再推出,而是让你的用户去帮助你完善服务,通过用户的完善才是真正尊重用户体验与用户需求的完善,比你闭门造车的结果要好得多。而且持续有新的功能推出反而会更加吸引到你的用户继续使用。而在服务推出后,则要不断地完善,就如keso在blog中提到的永远的测试版的概念。

4、让用户可随处使用你的服务。不要让你的用户只有在你的网站上才能享受到你的服务,而要让你的用户在任何地点都可以有使用你的服务的方式,就如del.icio.us的Linkroll功能,Flickr的blog发布功能,豆瓣的在自己blog上发布的功能,365key的昨日新闻功能等等。

5、不要违背用户的意愿。如果用户想离开,就大大方方地为他们的离开提供可行的方式,将重点放在提升网站的服务与用户的体验,让用户自己愿意回来,而不是让他们不得不继续使用你的服务。

6、简单就是美。为用户提供最简单但能够满足他们需求的方式。

7、用免费的服务吸引与挽留用户,不要急于收费。

8、不要在市场推广上浪费金钱。互联网与blog的普及已经让口耳相传的成本变得很低,只要你的服务能够让用户满意,他们就会主动替你在blog上宣传,为你带来病毒营销的力量。

9、不要过度融资。资金不足当然是个问题,但过度融资可能会让你的目标膨胀,业务多元化,放弃了自己最核心的产品和竞争力。

10、没有人一无是处。你需要认真地研究和对待每一个竞争者,借鉴他们的优势和强项,没有任何竞争者是一无是处不值得你学习的。

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